About PPP

About PPP

Glossary of Terms

The South Carolina Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services is charged with the community supervision of offenders placed on probation by the court and paroled by the State Board of Paroles and Pardons, as well as those on Youthful Offender Release from the South Carolina Department of Corrections. We also supervise offenders through a number of community sanctions, and help ensure that they meet specific conditions of parole.

The Department was created in 1941 with the expectation to maintain high standards of integrity, professionalism and accountability. Our vision is to be recognized nationally as a catalyst for positive change in the lives of offenders, a force for public safety, a leader in victim services and a responsible steward of public funds.

Mission Statement

  • To prepare offenders under our supervision toward becoming productive members of the community;
  • To provide assistance to the victims of crimes, the courts and the Parole Board; and
  • To protect public trust and safety.

Probation provides basic community supervision to offenders receiving a suspended sentence from the court. They are classified based on their need for services, supervision, and their risk of committing new offenses. The maximum duration of probation cannot exceed five years and offenders must pay a supervision fee based on a sliding scale determined by monthly income. Special conditions may also be imposed to further restrict their freedom, limit movement in the community, add further disciplinary measures, or require rehabilitative services. Violation of any of the standard or special conditions of probation may result in additional sanctions, up to and including revocation action by the court.

Paroled offenders living within the community are also supervised by SCDPPPS. These offenders are released by the Board of Paroles and Pardons to finish serving their sentences outside of prison, subject to certain conditions. Offenders are classified based on their need for services and risk of committing new offenses. Offenders on parole must pay a supervision fee based on a sliding scale determined by monthly income. Special conditions may be imposed by the Board to further restrict freedom, limit movement in the community, add further disciplinary measures, or require rehabilitative services. Violation of any of the standard or special conditions of parole may result in additional punitive sanctions, up to and including revocation action by the Board.

Pardon means that an individual is fully forgiven from all the legal consequences of his or her crime and conviction – direct and collateral – including the punishment, whether imprisonment, fine, or whatever penalty is provided for by law. After reviewing a pardon application, the Board of Paroles and Pardons determines an individual's eligibility.